News

Campus Reaction: Should homosexual couples be allowed to marry?

Steven Moore.

Steven Moore. Photo Credit (current students photos)/Christine Aiken

By: CHRISTINE AIKEN
Staff Writer

Over a decade ago, seven IU South Bend students were asked if gay marriage should be legal. The photographs of these students are not dated, though our deductions place them in the early 2000s. The idea of a same sex couple getting married at that time, was slightly less welcome, though most still felt it should be allowed even if it didn’t coincide with their personal beliefs.

“Two of my best gay friends have been happily committed to each other for 25 years, which is longer than most straight marriages I know. Who can frown upon that?”
Steven Moore, sophomore

Josh Stockbridge. Photo Credit (current students photos)/Christine Aiken

Josh Stockbridge. Photo Credit (current students photos)/Christine Aiken

“I don’t really care. If gay people want to get married, let them.”
Josh Stockbridge, freshman

Lawrence Giden. Photo Credit (current students photos)/Christine Aiken

Lawrence Giden. Photo Credit (current students photos)/Christine Aiken

“According to God’s law, the union should be between husband and wife.”
Lawrence Giden, junior

Michelle Hairston. Photo Credit (current students photos)/Christine Aiken

Michelle Hairston. Photo Credit (current students photos)/Christine Aiken

“I personally don’t believe in it, but if gay people want to marry, it doesn’t bother me.”
Michelle Hairston, freshman

Rebecca Gerdes. Photo Credit (current students photos)/Christine Aiken

Rebecca Gerdes. Photo Credit (current students photos)/Christine Aiken

“I think that every American should have the right to marry whoever they want.”
Rebecca Gerdes, sophomore

Clayton Celmer. Photo Credit (current students photos)/Christine Aiken

Clayton Celmer. Photo Credit (current students photos)/Christine Aiken

“I don’t care if gay people marry, but they shouldn’t have the exact same rights as heterosexual married people.”
Clayton Celmer, freshman

Amanda Griffin. Photo Credit (current students photos)/Christine Aiken

Amanda Griffin. Photo Credit (current students photos)/Christine Aiken

“It’s a touchy subject. My religion doesn’t approve of it, but I’m also not discriminatory.”
Amanda Griffin, freshman

Sabrina Lute. Photo Credit (current students photos)/Christine Aiken

Sabrina Lute. Photo Credit (current students photos)/Christine Aiken

Gay marriage still remains a debated topic over a decade later. Same-sex marriage is currently legal in 37 states and in the District of Columbia, though several states have appealed rulings that legalized same-sex marriages.

The good news for supporters of gay marriage is that the debate may soon be over. The U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to hear four cases on whether states can constitutionally ban or refuse to recognize same-sex marriages. A decision is expected by June of this year. If our current IUSB students have anything to say about it, everyone in America will soon have the right to marry whoever they choose.

“For me, it’s not a different institution. It’s just marriage. It’s two people committing to each other and whose commitment is recognized, legitimized as any other in this country.”
Sabrina Lute, junior

Grace Ball. Photo Credit (current students photos)/Christine Aiken

Grace Ball. Photo Credit (current students photos)/Christine Aiken

“No one person knows the true definition of love. The fact that they’re trying to define love is kind of ridonkulous – because how are you going to say what love is?”
Grace Ball, senior

Sherry Drudge. Photo Credit (current students photos)/Christine Aiken

Sherry Drudge. Photo Credit (current students photos)/Christine Aiken

“People should be allowed to love anyone or marry anyone they wish, regardless of gender. It’s no one’s business but those people’s what they do with their own lives.”
Sherry Drudge, freshman

Scott Davis. Photo Credit (current students photos)/Christine Aiken

Scott Davis. Photo Credit (current students photos)/Christine Aiken

“Marriage is a legal contract representing the union of souls between two people who love one another so much that they put the goals and hopes and dreams and lives of the other person before their very own. Does it really matter to you that two men are in love with one another? I believe George Washington and Thomas Jefferson would be appalled. I believe they would say mind your own business.”
Scott Davis, sophomore

Breezy McCall. Photo Credit (current students photos)/Christine Aiken

Breezy McCall. Photo Credit (current students photos)/Christine Aiken

“I have only positive thoughts on gay marriage and its direction. It warms my heart that our country recognizes that love is love no matter who it’s between. The amount of states that recognize gay marriage and the amount of states that are in work to recognize gay marriage make me proud to be an American. The progress is something we should all be proud of!”
Breezy McCall, freshman

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