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Student Profile: Psychic and Medium, Dusten Lyvers

By CECELIA ROEDER

Design Editor

     So many times when we hear the words “psychic” or “medium,” we’ll picture a gypsy with a crystal ball in a tent at the fair. Believe it or not, this stereotype can be very untrue. Dusten Lyvers, 19, is not a Psychology major at IU South Bend, but also talks to dead people.

Lyvers has come a long way from the 7 year old who proclaimed to his parents he was psychic. Watching Pokémon may have been the first way he learned the word “psychic,” but now, he takes his job very seriously.

“I saw spirits when I was very young. I always knew things. I thought it was normal,” said Lyvers.

Now Lyvers works at the Crystal Connection at Mishawalka, and also does readings for customers through his company, SoothsayerSage.

“A lot of people hear about me word-of-mouth,” explained Lyvers about his clientele, but this in no way means he can’t find people willing for psychic and mediumistic readings. “Since I started {SoothsayerSage] last year, I’ve done about 50 readings.”

Lyvers was sure to make it clear to the differences between being psychic and being mediumistic.

“Mediums talk to those who have crossed over, and psychics focus on the person,” said Lyvers. “All people have a little bit of psychic power in them. But while mediums are psychic, not all psychics are mediums.”

He didn’t originally believe himself a medium, but his roommate, who is a medium himself, encouraged him that he did indeed have such a skill. It helped him to embrace his mediumistic capabilities. He recently expanded his readings to offer not only personal spiritual readings and evaluations, but to also contact those who have “moved on” from this world, and convey messages to those who survived them.

Lyvers wants to use his spiritual skills and psychology degree to be able to help people in a unique way. “I’m an empathic person,” he explained, “I can feel what people are feeling.” With this ability, he feels he would be able to fully help people with whatever issues they find themselves suffering.

After hearing all this discussion about contacting those who have moved on and psychic readings, I knew I would have to have a reading done myself, for, you know, science. I came to the reading relaxed, but with a dose of healthy skepticism.

The only think Lyvers knew about the dead relative I had chosen was that she was my grandmother. So when asked me first thing about a black dog, I was quite shocked. My siblings and parents knew that my grandma had loved our giant black lab while both were still alive, but nobody else would logically be able to make such a guess. I don’t have pictures of either on Facebook, and I don’t mention either in casual conversation.

Lyvers made great attempts to offer specific information throughout my mediumistic reading and psychic readings. He didn’t get every detail right, but he got many things correct. He spoke confidently about many things in my life that were very true. Told me confidently that I would be getting a master’s degree (something I had only told only my advisor and two other people I was considering.) He also knew where I wanted to move after college, another thing I don’t tell a lot of people. His description of an ex-boyfriend was almost spot-on, and he told me my grandma had bad back pain and breast cancer, all without prompting and previous knowledge.

There are the skeptics out there. They say people learn to do “cold readings,” and make general life statements that we like to fit think our lives. It’s true that that charlatans are everywhere. It’s important to take anyone who claims to talk to dead people with a grain of salt. Still, Lyvers did tell me several things I’m pretty sure he would have to stalk me pretty heavily to find out.

I’m not a firm believer, but it was clear to me that Lyvers wasn’t making things up. The only way you can decide for yourself is to take a chance and book a reading. You may not leave with a belief in mediums, but you will not leave bored.

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